January 13, 2013

Wes Welker and the Unbearable Whiteness of Being an NFL Receiver

It's no secret that the NFL discriminates against White athletes, particularly in the so-called "skill positions" -- like wide receiver. On any given Sunday, during the regular season, there are 64 starting wide receivers on NFL rosters. For the last week of the 2012 season, only eight of them were White -- all the rest, were black. This is particularly surprising considering that Whites outnumber blacks by a factor of six in this country.

It's also surprising seeing that, with the exception of speed, the skills (agility and hand-eye co-ordination) that constitute a good receiver are more prevalent in the White population. That Whites are more agile is well-known among football coaches and player personnel -- because it is tested for in the scouting combines. There are three tests: 20 yard shuttle, 60 yard shuttle, and the 3 cone drill that directly measure agility. The mean scores for Whites are significanly higher than for blacks, for all three tests. While there is no test for hand-eye co-ordination, that White receivers are superior in this category is borne-out week after week, when they consistently catch the ball at a much higher rate than their black counterparts. (White starting receivers catch 63.4% of the passes thrown their way, black starters catch only 57.1% of the passes targeted at them.)

This obvious discrimination makes Wes Welker something of an anomaly. Over the last six seasons (seasons in which he has been allowed to start consistently) he has, arguably, been the best receiver in the game. No one has caught more balls -- 672 -- over that time period. The next closest player is Brandon Marshall with 592. Welker has caught an average of 13 more passes, per season, than the next best guy.

Receptions, however, are not the best measure of receiving excellence. There are better stats that demonstrate excellence at the position: yards per target (or the number of yards a receiver gains per chance he is given to gain yards), yards after catch, and reception percentage. I prepared a simple table to compare elite receivers. Players were chosen if they had finished in the top ten, at least four of the last six seasons, in one of two categories: receptions and yardage. Seven wide-outs qualified. They are listed in order of reception totals.

Player
Recepts
Targets
REC%
Yards
YPT
Avg./Reception
W. Welker
672
925
72.6%
7459
8.1
11.1
B. Marshall
592
993
59.6%
7446
7.5
12.6
R. Wayne
578
935
61.8%
7589
8.1
13.1
R. White
563
953
59.1%
7773
8.2
13.8
L. Fitzgerald
534
954
56.0%
7278
7.6
13.6
A. Johnson
507
779
65.1%
7301
9.4
14.4
C. Johnson
488
882
55.3%
7836
8.9
16.1


Player
YAC
YAC/Reception
YAC/Yards
GP
GS
W. Welker
3848
5.73
51.6%
93
78
B. Marshall
2281
3.85
30.6%
92
90
R. White
2265
4.02
29.1%
96
92
L. Fitzgerald
1967
3.68
27.0%
95
94
A. Johnson
2192
4.32
30.0%
77
76
R. Wayne
2131
3.69
28.1%
96
95
C. Johnson
2366
4.85
30.2%
92
86

As you can see from the table, Andre Johnson leads the yards per target (YPT) category with 9.4 yards. Wes Welker is tied for fourth place with 8.1 YPT. But because YPT depends so heavily on how an offense uses a receiver (those in an offense that throws a lot of deep passes will benefit from that) it alone isn't sufficient to determine the best receiver.

The other two categories, because they are largely dependant on the receiver himself, are somewhat better measures of receiver greatness. And Welker dominates both categories. He dominates the group in reception percentage (REC%) at 72.6%, with A. Johnson the next best at 65.1% and Calvin Johnson bringing up the rear with a 55.3 REC%.

But where he really separates from the pack is in his ability to gain yards after he catches the ball. He averages 5.73 yards after each catch. The next best among the elite is C. Johnson at 4.85 YAC with Larry Fitzgerald only gaining 3.68 YAC. Even more telling is the fact that 51.6% of his total yardage is gained after he receives the ball. The average of the rest of this group is less than 29%.

Although, Welker is perhaps the best receiver in the league, it is highly unlikely he is the best White receiver in the land. He is simply a very talented player who has been given an opportunity to play at the position. There are 10's of thousands of White football players across the land. But few of them -- no matter how much better than their black competitors, they prove themselves to be on high school and college gridirons -- will ever be given an opportunity to start an NFL game. Why?

During the middle part of the last century, a Jew-dominated group of Cultural Marxists from the Frankfurt School made what they called a "long march through [our] institutions." In other words, they infiltrated all of America's institutions of power and took control of them (they call this "Entryism"). They did this so they could, as they say, "induce cultural pessimism in White males." In other words, they wanted to use their new found control over our culture to strip White men and boys of their confidence. A key strategy of this plan was to gain administrative control of the sports leagues and use that control to slowly replace White men with non-Whites, (particularly) blacks. We see this in every one of the major sports leagues with the exception of hockey. Blacks are not better athletes, they are simply being used as part of a larger strategy to destroy White America.

4 comments:

Jason Aydelotte said...

It is evident the NFL, once a predominantely White athletic organization, has been infitrated by what I suspect to be the naacp, & organizations of similar nature, to displace superior White athletes with marxist ideologies of equality (civil rights) similar to Affirmative Action.

Anonymous said...

Awesome article. Exactly what we have been saying for years at CasteFootball. Nice to see this clear thinking and commonsense applied elsewhere. Congrats to the author.

Anonymous said...

great article, but one correction, its a 20 yard shuttle, not 30. Football is definitely more about short area quickness rather than straight line speed 40 yards or more. The record for 30+ yard td runs was 6 for the longest time, held by Jim Brown, tied once by DeAngelo Williams a few years ago and only broken once a few years back by Chris Johnson. That means most backs are getting about 4 to 5 "home runs" a season at the most.

Also it is said that Whites don't possess "loose hips" (which can't be measured) to make people miss. We know there are no Whites starting at rb this season. The top 3 backs made tacklers miss about 4 times a game on around 20 carries, then it dips low to where guys like Arian Foster made tacklers miss 29 times on 351 times. Whites have thee quickness to make people miss.

Coaches often view the field in terms of 30 yards for most plays because of pass protection. The average qb in the NFL gets about 2.7 to 2.9 seconds to throw, sometimes they might get up to 3.4 seconds. No receiver can run a 40 yard dash in 2.9 seconds or even 3.4 seconds. Of course there is the occasional play action that allows for extra time but usually a big play is considered 20 yards or more with some yards coming after the catch.

Russell A. James said...

Thx. I'll make the correction on the "20 yard shuttle."

Great observation on the "making 'em miss" myth.